Measuring Influence is not all about Klout – The Tools

Klout has gained momentum and recognition in the last year, including new funding. However, the measurement values are being questioned by many which questions if they really are the defacto influencer tool. Check out the info on Oneforty.com, http://mar.gy/BU1x , to see other tools to use and consider when looking to see the value of you or your brand’s influence.

Challenge: run your own test with these tools plus Klout for the next 4 – 6 weeks. Choose one day per week to run the tools and take notes of the data. After 4 – 6 weeks see which tools gives you the most consistent information for your needs and how Klout changed in relation to that data.

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2 thoughts on “Measuring Influence is not all about Klout – The Tools

  1. Hi Nakeva,

    Thanks for the pointer. I think your challenge is a good one, because influence can change over time (someone may shift topics, start tweeting/blogging/writing more or less, etc.). What I think most of the tools discussed here are missing is topical relevance — meaning not just providing Influencer identification/scoring “in the raw” or in general (big) buckets, but down at a very segmented market level (e.g., not just cell phones or even smart phones, but at the level of Android or iOS).

    It also is helpful to look at Influencers not just on Twitter (or in, say, blogs), but across a wide range of social media and traditional media (there are still plenty of “traditional” journalists who can move markets). That’s what we’re trying to provide with our new sevice mPACT, which we launched on Monday. We’d invite any of your readers to sign up for a free trial and test it against these other solutions.

    • Pat, your points on topical relevance in influence monitoring are what is part of the missing pieces. When you review the Klout site and see the most influential people by topic, such as social media, you expect those to be the people that discuss/share most things related to social media. In some cases, what is showing up may be spam accounts or users that barely talk on the topic.

      I think the scoring and updating of data points should be more frequent and cover more than just tweets, as far as Klout is concerned. Using these other tools brings in a full picture to choose how you view and reference your data but leaves room for misinterpretation. While having the information available and manage a brand or name is respectable, I don’t rely on just one source. If that tool is out there, it probably runs a few thousand dollars.

      I’m interested to know what your tool is about!

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